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Fire Reduces Much Of The Notre Dame Cathedral To Ashes

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Fire Reduces Much Of The Notre Dame Cathedral To Ashes

A major fire erupted at the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris a couple of hours ago. The medieval cathedral which was undergoing renovations suffered extensive damage as a result of the raging fire that engulfed it on Monday.

While the authorities still haven’t yet determined the cause of the fire and are keen on investigating it, it is reported that the inferno has been contained. Thankfully, no deaths have been reported.

The Notre Dame Cathedral construction began in 1163 and was completed in 1345. Late on Monday evening fire chiefs confirmed that the structure of the cathedral has been saved, despite initial fears it might be entirely destroyed.

Video footage showed part of the roof of the cathedral collapsing into itself as the fire rages on.

On Monday evening, Paris fire chief Jean-Claude Gallet told reporters that the firefighters had managed to save the cathedral’s landmark rectangular towers from the blaze.

“We now believe that the two towers of Notre Dame have been saved.” Gallet said. “We now consider that the main structure of Notre Dame has been saved and preserved.” Gallet added revealing that there was still a risk that some of the interior structures could collapse.

Notre-Dame Cathedral

Notre-Dame Cathedral

French President Emmanuel Macron addressed the nation just hours after the 850 year old building went up in flames. In an emotive speech,  Macron called the fire a “terrible tragedy” and confirmed that the cathedral’s stone facade and two main towers avoided collapsing amid the destruction. He also revealed that a national fundraising campaign to restore Notre Dame would be launched Tuesday and called on the world’s greatest talents to help.

“I’m telling you all tonight — we will rebuild this cathedral together. This is probably part of the French destiny. And we will do it in the next years. Starting tomorrow, a national donation scheme will be started that will extend beyond our borders.”

He added, “We will appeal to the greatest talents and we will rebuild Notre-Dame because that’s what the French are waiting for, because that’s what our history deserves, because it’s our deepest destiny.”

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Nurse Wants To Be Sneaky When Mom Snaps Photo Letting Everyone Know She Saw Her

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Nurse Wants To Be ‘Sneaky’ When Mom Snaps Photo Letting Everyone Know She Saw Her

When Little Sophie first fell ill in May of 2017, her parents, Shelby and Jonathan, assumed it was just allergies. They took their daughter to the doctors when she started struggling to breath and scheduled to have an allergy test a few days later. Sophie’s doctor suspected asthma but it turned out to be much more serious.

One night little Sophie stopped breathing. Shelby and Jonathan rushed her to the hospital in an ambulance. At the hospital, doctors discovered a softball-sized mass in Sophie’s chest. She had T-cell lymphoma, a rare and aggressive form of cancer.

Suddenly, little Sophie was on the line fighting for life. She was put on aggressive chemotherapy, but it failed to stop her cancer from spreading.

Doctors discovered a softball-sized mass in Sophie’s chest. She had T-cell lymphoma.

Doctors discovered a softball-sized mass in Sophie’s chest. She had T-cell lymphoma.

The cancer treatments affected Sophie’s ability to talk, eat, walk or use her hands.

Sophie’s parents spent every minute they could by their little girl’s bed side. Sophie’s mom, Shelby, had only one concern, her daughter and her health.

During this very difficult time, Shelby noticed a special nurse who was trying  so hard to go unnoticed, but Shelby was watching.

Read Also: Viral Photo Of Smiling Preemie Gives Hope To Parents Of Premature Babies Everywhere

Shelby took a photo while the nurse’s back was turned and posted it on the Facebook page that they had created to document Sophie’s fight against the disease. In the post she revealed everything she had observed during her child’s care. The post reads:

I see you. I sit on this couch all day long and, I see you. You try so hard to be unnoticed by me and my child.

I see your face drop a little when she sees you and cries. You try so many ways to ease her fears and win her over. I see you hesitate to stick her or pull bandaids off. You say ‘No owies’ and ‘I’m sorry’ more times in one day than most people say ‘thank you’..

I see all of those rubber bracelets on your arms and wrapped around your stethoscope, each one for a child that you’ve cared for and loved.

Shelby took a photo while the nurse’s back was turned and posted it on the Facebook to express her gratitude.

Shelby took a photo while the nurse’s back was turned and posted it on the Facebook to express her gratitude.

I see you stroke her little bald head and tuck her covers around her tightly. I see you holding the crying mom that got bad news. I see you trying to chart on the computer while holding the baby whose mom can’t-or won’t be at the hospital with her.

You put aside what’s happening in your life for 12 hours straight to care for very sick and something’s dying children. You go into each room with a smile no matter what’s happening in there. You see Sophie’s name on the schedule and come to check on us even when she isn’t your patient.

You call the doctor, blood bank, and pharmacy as many times as necessary to get my child what she needs in a timely manner. You check on me as often as you check on her. You sit and listen to me ramble for 10 minutes even though your phone is buzzing and your to do list is a mile long.

Shelby and Sophie in the hospital

Shelby and Sophie in the hospital

I see you. We all see you. No amount of snack baskets or cards can fully express how appreciated you are. You are Jesus to us every single day. Our children wouldn’t get what they need without you. Moms like me wouldn’t feel sane or heard without you. You save our babies and we couldn’t do this without you.”

Shelby’s heartfelt message touched nurses and parents who had experienced similar experiences across the world, and rapidly went viral.

Nurses jobs are very demanding and unimaginably difficult. They live through the worst times of patients’ and their loved ones’ lives day in day out and still remain ever so dedicated.

Unfortunately, little Sophie never got a chance to get healthy and express her appreciation to the nurses who fought along with her to keep her alive. Her little body just couldn’t handle all the treatments and the aggressive cancer any more.

Unfortunately, little Sophie never got a chance to get healthy and express her appreciation to the nurses who fought along with her to keep her alive.

Unfortunately, little Sophie never got a chance to get healthy and express her appreciation to the nurses who fought along with her to keep her alive.

Sophie relapsed again on December 22, 2017 and her parents decided to withdraw treatment and let their baby girl rest. They got to spend only thirteen days loving on her and enjoying their last moments until little Sophie passed away in their arms on January 4, 2018.

”My goal through this entire process has been to be transparent and honest and shine light on what really goes on during a battle against cancer. I haven’t sugarcoated the bad days but, I’ve also been able to show the great work the Lord has done throughout this. I hope to continue to do that as we continue on without her.” Shelby said.

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Man With Down Syndrome, Honored For Working At Same Mcdonald’s For 27 Years, Dies

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Man With Down Syndrome, Honored For Working At Same Mcdonald’s For 27 Years, Dies

Chris Campbell, a man with Down Syndrome who worked at the same McDonald’s in Georgia for 27 years, has passed away.

Family members confirmed to 11Alive that Chris died on the morning of 11th June. They also added that his death was sudden and unexpected.

Chris Campbell passed away without life insurance and his family is asking for donations via GoFundMe to assist in covering funeral costs.

Chris Campbell, a man with Down Syndrome who worked at the same McDonald’s for 27 years, has died

Chris Campbell, a man with Down Syndrome who worked at the same McDonald’s for 27 years, has died

The GoFundMe page describes him as “a boy scout, church acolyte, community volunteer, McDonald’s employee, loving son, grandson, brother, uncle and friend. He was so special in so many ways to so many people.”

Writing on the page, his family further added, “Chris Campbell was a wonderful example of the difference made by a loving family, supportive community and strong advocates. He was special in so many ways to so many people. He loved all things pirate and enjoyed celebrating life through music and laughter! His family feels an immense loss and will miss Chris’ sweet smile and generous spirit.”

Read Also: Boy With Down Syndrome Is Melting Hearts All Over After Landing A Modeling Contract

Chris was a good employee to the very end. He was very loyal and treated all customers with respect. The Down Syndrome Association of Atlanta and his co-workers honored him in March by throwing him a party, with a cake and a trophy for being an employee for twenty seven years.

“He’s got determination, a lot of fight, and he’s going to the top no matter what… and no one’s going to stop him!” Chris’s mother said at the time, according to 11Alive.

The Down Syndrome Association of Atlanta also issued a statement after his story went viral.

After Chris’s story went viral, The Down Syndrome Association of Atlanta issued a statement saying, “They love their families, value their friends, root for the home team, and cope with the challenges of daily living such as managing a budget, living independently and having a job. These individuals and their families want the same opportunities for education, health, relationships, community involvement and careers as everyone else. With advocacy and the right supports, we can help make that happen!”

“For anyone to be at any business for 27 years is pretty remarkable. For a man with Down syndrome to be employed by the same brand and three different owner-operators over the years speaks to his personality.” Kellie Vander Veur, the manager at the McDonald’s where Chris worked, told InsideEdition in March.

“I like to clean, mopping, cleaning the tables and making Happy Meal boxes. I love the Happy Meal boxes. Every time I give them the boxes it makes each person happy.” Chris said in March.

Chris’s story is a beacon of hope for parents of children with Down syndrome. “His mother … always told him, ‘You can do anything you want to do,’” Kellie Vander Veur said.

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World War II Code Talker Whose Messages Helped America’s Victory Dies Aged 96

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World War II Code Talker Whose Messages Helped America’s Victory Dies Aged 96

One of the last remaining World War II-era Navajo code talkers, William Tully Brown, has died at the age of 96. William Tully Brown served in the Marine Corps and used the code to help transmit top secret messages during the war.

Navajo Nation President, Jonathan Nez, announced Brown’s death on June 3rd which occurred in Winslow, Arizona. The cause of death wasn’t disclosed.

One of the last remaining World War II-era Navajo code talkers, William Tully Brown, has died at the age of 96.

One of the last remaining World War II-era Navajo code talkers, William Tully Brown, has died at the age of 96.

According to CNN, William Tully Brown is the third Navajo Code Talker to pass away since May 10.

Brown was one of 400 Navajos who served in the Marine Corps, using a code based on their native language to outsmart the Japanese in World War II.

The Navajo code is the only spoken military code “never to have been deciphered”. The undecipherable messages were a key factor in securing U.S. military victories at Iwo Jima and several other battles in the Pacific theater.

Read Also: This 99 Year-Old World War II Veteran Celebrates College Graduation

“During the battle for Iwo Jima, Navajo Code Talkers in the Marines successfully transmitted more than 800 messages, which proved critical to America’s victory,” CNN states.

It was also used during the Korean War and ended during the Vietnam war.

“From 1942 until 1945, Navajo code was used by the US Marines and Navy, and they tell us that we saved hundreds of thousands of lives and helped win the war in the Pacific to preserve our freedom and liberty.” said Peter McDonald, president of the Navajo Code Talkers Association told CNN.

William Tully Brown enlisted with the Marine Corps in 1944 and was honorably discharged in 1946.

William Tully Brown enlisted with the Marine Corps in 1944 & became part of a legendary group of Native Americans who encoded messages in the Navajo language

William Tully Brown enlisted with the Marine Corps in 1944 & became part of a legendary group of Native Americans who encoded messages in the Navajo language

He was the recipient of the American Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, Navy Occupation Service Medal, World War II Victory Medal, and Honorable Service Lapel Button.

His granddaughter, Delilah Yazzie, revealed that he would only talk about his war experiences when asked about it. Speaking to the Farmington Daily Times, Delilah said, “He was a very humble person. He didn’t like being in the limelight, he was reserved. He was a jokester and he liked to make people laugh,”

Watch the video below to find out more about this clever war tactic from fellow Navajo code talker Roy Hawthorne.

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